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  • Writer's pictureDaneesha Jonescu ABCDT

Goldendoodles and Allergies: Shedding, Coat Types & Furnishings Explained


This image is a promotional graphic for Big House K9, focusing on "Goldendoodles and Allergies." It features a happy, curly-coated Goldendoodle sitting on a wooden deck, wearing a plaid bandana. The text below the image reads: "Shedding, Coat Types & Furnishings Explained." The graphic includes the Big House K9 logo, Instagram handle (@big_house_k9), and website (www.bighousek9.com).

Goldendoodles are adored for their charming personalities and unique coats, but choosing the right puppy can be a daunting task, especially for families with allergies. In this comprehensive guide, we'll dive into the different coat types, shedding patterns, and the role of furnishings in Goldendoodles. Whether you're looking for a low-shedding pup or just curious about these fluffy companions, this post will equip you with the knowledge you need.


Shedding and Furnishings in Goldendoodles

Goldendoodles are often sought after for their low-shedding coats, but not all Goldendoodles are created equal. The key to understanding their shedding lies in the concept of furnishings.


What Are Furnishings?

Furnishings refer to the longer facial hair, including eyebrows, mustaches, and beards, that give doodles their distinctive look. In genetic terms, the furnishing gene is denoted as "F". Dogs with furnishings typically have less shedding than those without.


This image features a fluffy white dog, a Goldendoodle, sitting on green grass. The dog is wearing a brown bandana with a plaid pattern, and it appears happy with its tongue out. Dogs like this one, with the furnishing gene, typically shed less.





  • Furnished (F/IC or F/F): Dogs with one or two copies of the furnishing gene usually shed less.








This image shows a golden-colored dog, likely a Golden Retriever, lying down on a surface with its front paws extended. The dog is panting with its tongue out and appears happy. Dogs like this one, with an improper coat (unfurnished gene), typically shed more and have shorter facial hair.




  • Unfurnished (IC/IC): These dogs, also known as having an improper coat, tend to shed more and have shorter facial hair.










Genetic testing is crucial in predicting these traits. Breeders can test for the furnishing gene to ensure the desired coat type, which is especially important for families looking for low-shedding pets.


Coat Types in Goldendoodles

Goldendoodles come in a variety of coat types, each with its own shedding characteristics and maintenance needs. Let's explore the most common ones.



This image features a fluffy, tan-colored dog, likely a Goldendoodle, sitting on a grassy area with a blue object in the background. The dog looks happy with its tongue out. Dogs like this one, with furnished and straight coats, often have loose waves and require regular grooming. These dogs typically shed at low to the lowest levels.






Furnished & Straight

Straight coats, often seen in multigen Goldendoodles, are easier to maintain but still require regular grooming. These coats usually feature loose waves rather than tight curls.

  • Genetics: F/IC or F/F

  • Shed Level: Low to lowest




This image shows a wavy-coated, reddish-brown dog, likely a Goldendoodle, lying on a grassy lawn with vibrant greenery and flowers in the background. The dog looks content with its tongue out. Wavy coats, common in F1, F1b, and multigen Goldendoodles, are easy to care for and offer a stylish look. These dogs generally shed at low to the lowest levels.





Furnished & Wavy

Wavy coats are typical in F1, F1b, and multigen Goldendoodles. They strike a balance between curly and straight, making them relatively easy to care for while maintaining a stylish appearance.

  • Genetics: F/IC or F/F

  • Shed Level: Low to lowest




This image features a curly-coated, reddish-brown dog, likely a Goldendoodle, sitting on a wooden deck. The dog is wearing a plaid bandana and looks cheerful. Curly coats, typical in F1b and F1bb generations, resemble Poodles and require frequent brushing and trimming to prevent matting. These dogs usually shed at low to the lowest levels.



Furnished & Curly

Curly coats, reminiscent of Poodles, are common in F1b and F1bb generations. These coats require frequent brushing and trimming to prevent matting.

  • Genetics: F/IC or F/F

  • Shed Level: Low to lowest




This image shows a light-colored dog, likely a Golden Retriever, standing on a dirt path with trees and greenery in the background. The dog has an unfurnished or improper coat, characterized by short facial hair and a tendency to shed more. Dogs with this IC/IC genetic makeup can still be wonderful pets, but they may not be ideal for allergy sufferers due to their medium to high shedding levels.



Improper Coat and Furnishings

Unfurnished or improper coats result in dogs that have short facial hair and tend to shed more. These dogs, with genetics IC/IC, can still be wonderful pets but may not be the best choice for allergy sufferers.

  • Genetics: IC/IC

  • Shed Level: Medium to high





This image features a young, curly-coated, reddish-brown dog, likely a Goldendoodle, sitting on a concrete surface. The dog has weak furnishings, with sparse or slowly developing facial hair. Dogs with this genetic makeup (Fw/IC or F2/IC) might shed more than fully furnished ones and require less frequent grooming. Their shedding level is typically low to moderate.



Weakly Furnished Goldendoodles

Some Goldendoodles exhibit weak furnishings, where the facial hair is sparse or takes longer to develop. These dogs might shed more than fully furnished ones and require slightly less frequent grooming.

  • Genetics: Fw/IC or F2/IC

  • Shed Level: Low to moderate





Genetic Testing and Its Importance

Choosing a breeder who uses genetic testing can significantly impact your satisfaction with a Goldendoodle. Testing for the furnishing gene (F) and the shedding gene (RSPO2) can predict the coat type and shedding level, helping you select a puppy that fits your needs. Here’s why it matters:


  1. Predictability: Genetic testing provides a clear picture of the potential coat type and shedding level of the puppies. This predictability is crucial for allergy sufferers who need a low-shedding pet.

  2. Health Assurance: Beyond coat type, genetic testing can identify potential health issues early on, ensuring you get a healthier puppy.

  3. Transparency: Breeders who conduct genetic testing demonstrate a commitment to ethical breeding practices and transparency. This builds trust and ensures you are making an informed decision.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness: Knowing the genetic makeup of a puppy can save future expenses related to unexpected health issues and grooming needs.


This image provides tips for puppy buyers in a neatly designed format. The tips include:  Research Breeders: Look for breeders who perform genetic testing not only on the parent dogs but also on the puppies and are transparent about their breeding practices. Understand Coat Types: Familiarize yourself with the different coat types and their maintenance requirements. Consider Allergies: If allergies are a concern, opt for a puppy with furnishings and discuss this with your breeder. The image is branded with the logo and website of Big House K9 (@big_house_k9, www.bighousek9.com).



FAQs

Q: Are all Goldendoodles hypoallergenic? A: No dog is completely hypoallergenic. Goldendoodles with furnishings tend to shed less, which can help reduce allergens, but individual reactions vary.


Q: How often should I groom my Goldendoodle? A: This depends on the coat type. Curly coats require more frequent grooming than straight or wavy coats. Regular brushing and trimming are essential to prevent matting.


Q: Can genetic testing guarantee a low-shedding Goldendoodle? A: While genetic testing can predict coat type and shedding levels, it can't guarantee that a particular dog will be completely non-shedding or hypoallergenic.





Wrapping It Up

Choosing the right Goldendoodle involves understanding their coat types, shedding patterns, and the significance of furnishings. By opting for a breeder who uses genetic testing, you can better predict these traits and find a puppy that suits your family's needs. Remember, every dog is unique, and while genetic factors play a significant role, individual care and maintenance are equally important.


For more insights on Goldendoodles and tips on selecting the perfect puppy, stay tuned to our blog.

~Daneesha

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